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posted 3 hours ago - 6,329 notes - reblog

(Source: cannibal-rainbow)

posted 3 hours ago - 212,313 notes - reblog
posted 3 hours ago - 15,776 notes - reblog

(Source: overeacts)

posted 4 hours ago - 138,417 notes - reblog

evilscientist:

teacher: your homework will only have 4 problems!

homework: 1a 1b 1c 1d 1e 2a 2b 2c 2d 2e 3a 3b 3c 3d 3e 4a 4b 4c 4d 4e

posted 4 hours ago - 1,262 notes - reblog

teacupwarrior:

Imagine that at the end of Dumbledore’s speech at the beginning of the year, he asks if there are any questions, and one first year muggleborn kid raises his hand, whips out a smart phone and asks for the wifi password.

And then Dumbledore just casually says “Sherbet lemon, with a capital S”, and commences the feast like it’s no big deal while the non-muggleborns think WIFI is some sort of secret society.

posted 4 hours ago - 76,172 notes - reblog

(Source: babygoatsandfriends)

posted 5 hours ago - 25,856 notes - reblog

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

posted 5 hours ago - 33,968 notes - reblog

MUSIC ASKS

1: A song you like with a color in the title
2: A song you like with a number in the title
3: A song that reminds you of summertime
4: A song that reminds you of someone you would rather forget about
5: A song that needs to be played LOUD
6: A song that makes you want to dance
7: A song to drive to
8: A song about drugs or alcohol
9: A song that makes you happy
10: A song that makes you sad
11: A song that you never get tired of
12: A song from your preteen years
13: One of your favorite 80’s songs
14: A song that you would love played at your wedding
15: A song that is a cover by another artist
16: One of your favorite classical songs
17: A song that would sing a duet with on karaoke
18: A song from the year that you were born
19: A song that makes you think about life
20: A song that has many meanings to you
21: A favorite song with a person’s name in the title
22: A song that moves you forward
23: A song that you think everybody should listen to
24: A song by a band you wish were still together
25: A song by an artist no longer living
26: A song that makes you want to fall in love
27: A song that breaks your heart
28: A song by an artist with a voice that you love
29: A song that you remember from your childhood
30: A song that reminds you of yourself

- (via lanadelpalmer)

(Source: candyqueenbitch)

posted 5 hours ago - 3,457 notes - reblog

buddhalovingbadass:

 Harry Potter Fancast | Antonia Thomas as Hermione Granger

(Source: lestatthewolfkiller)

posted 5 hours ago - 9,007 notes - reblog

englishsnow:

 Takumi Yashima